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ORUK Supports Study into Hip Pain in Professional Golfers

ORUK Supports Study into Hip Pain in Professional Golfers

Posted on: 08-03-2017

ORUK recently supported a study carried out by Professor Damian Griffin, University of Warwick into Hip Pain in Professional Golfers. The study took place at the European Challenge Golf tournament at the Scottish Hydro Event in Aviemore

The European Challenge Tour is a professional golf tour with the event in Aviemore attracting 150 professional players. Clinical questionnaires and examinations were performed on 75 players. Of these 55 volunteer players underwent MRI examinations of both hips.

With ORUK’s support the team were able to perform these scans and as a result characterise their hip morphology and assess for joint injury. A mobile 1.5tesla MRI scanner was provided by Spire Healthcare at a negotiated discount.  It is believed that outside of the Olympics this was the first time that such a scanner has been on site at a sporting event!

The research aimed to establish the prevalence of hip pain, to characterise the examination findings and to determine the prevalence of cam and pincer hip morphology in professional golfers. By understanding each of these factors the team were able to establish the proportion of golfers whose pain was attributed to Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).

Previous research has shown that 17% of golfers get significant amounts of hip pain compared to 3 – 4% of the general population. FAI is an increasingly recognised cause of hip pain in young adults. It is characterised by certain hip shape abnormalities (cam and pincer hip shapes), these cause premature contact between the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Cam and pincer hip shape abnormalities are thought to be present in approximately 30% of the general population and are associated with hip osteoarthritis. It is thought that cam and pincer hip shapes are more common in certain professional athletes, however the prevalence in golfers is unknown. The nature of the rapid rotational hip movements during a golf swing makes golfers particularly prone to hip injury and development of FAI syndrome.

The results are now being evaluated by Professor Griffin and his team at the Warwick Medical School. We anticipate that their media team will be publicising the study on their website in the near future. ORUK will be recognised as a supporter of this important research.

 

The above report was provided by Mr Edward Dickenson, Research Fellow to Professor Damian Griffin, University of Warwick and edited by ORUK.

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